Lockout / Tagout Compliance

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Lockout Tagout / Control of Hazardous Energy

Approximately 3 million workers service equipment and face the greatest risk of injury if lockout/tagout is not properly implemented. Compliance with the lockout/tagout standard (29 CFR 1910.147) prevents an estimated 120 fatalities and 50,000 injuries each year. Workers injured on the job from exposure to hazardous energy lose an average of 24 workdays for recuperation. In a study conducted by the United Auto Workers (UAW), 20% of the fatalities (83 of 414) that occurred among their members between 1973 and 1995 were attributed to inadequate hazardous energy control procedures specifically, lockout/tagout procedures.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN LOCKOUT AND HAZARDOUS ENERGY CONTROL ?

Lockout / Tagout (LOTO) and Hazardous Energy Control / Control of Hazardous Energy refers to the same standard of preventing unexpected start up or movement of equipment. The terms are used interchangably, although “Lockout” is more universally used in the United States as it is the term OSHA uses, while ANSI uses “Control of Hazardous Energy ” in their standard, which is used more often by non-US entities.

FEDERAL OSHA & STATE OSH LOCKOUT / TAGOUT COMPLIANCE

The #1 most cited OSHA regulation for manufacturing is Lockout-Tagout (LOTO). LOTO fines from OSHA increased over 65% from 2010 to 2011.

Proper application of lockout-tagout (hazardous energy controls)  violations are on OSHA’s Top 10 “Most Often Cited Violations” and Top 10 “Most Serious Violations” lists.  While many companies have general written policies, they are lacking the equipment specific procedures which provide workers with the specific steps to properly isolate energy sources.  Lockout / Tagout fines are based on each piece of equipment, and can add up to tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars.

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OSHA CFR 29 1910.147 provides regulations on LOTO and 25 states have their own approved lockout tagout / blockout programs. The most overlooked aspect of a lockout tagout program is failure to provide equipment specific lockout procedures. A general corporate written policy does not meet the requirements of OSHA.

State OSH Programs
Federal OSHA Programs
Alaska (AK) New Mexico (NM) Alabama (AL) Montana (MT)
Arizona (AZ) New York (NY) Arkansas (AR) Nebraska (NE)
California (CA) North Carolina (NC) Colorado (CO) New Hampshire (NH)
Connecticut (CT) Oregon (OR) Delaware (DE) North Dakota (ND)
Hawaii (HI) Puerto Rico (PR) Florida (FL) Ohio (OH)
Illinois (IL) South Carolina (SC) Georgia (GA) Oklahoma (OK)
Indiana (IN) Tennessee (TN) Idaho (ID) Pennsylvania (PA)
Iowa (IA) Utah (UT) Kansas (KS) Rhode Island (RI)
Kentucky (KY) Vermont (VT) Louisiana (LA) South Dakota (SD)
Maryland (MD) Virgin Islands (VI) Maine (ME) Texas (TX)
Michigan (MI) Virginia (VA) Massachusets (MA) West Virgina (WV)
MInnesota (MN) Washington (WA) Mississippi (MS) Wisconsin (WI)
Nevada (NV) Wyoming (WY) Missouri (MO)
New Jersey (NJ)

 

5 STEPS TO LOCKOUT / TAGOUT (LOTO) COMPLIANCE

  1. Equipment Specific Lockout Written Procedures
  2. Lockout Training
  3. Padlocks and Lockout Devices
  4. Periodic / Annual Audits
  5. Written Lockout Policy

The most common problem found in lock out / tag out compliance is the lack of written equipment specific procedures. Having a overall plan (company lockout / tagout policy) is only one part of lockout / tagout compliance and does not bring a facility or plant into full compliance.  Contact your Martin Technical Lockout Expert to get a lockout program evaluation or a quote on the services you need.

WHAT IS LOCKOUT / BLOCKOUT ?

As stated above, some states have thier own OSH programs that can have some differences from the federal OSHA programs. In the State of California, General Industry Safety Order, it calls its program lockout / blockout.  Blockout refers to the “blocking” of equipment that can rotate or move due to gravity.  Blocking out moving parts is part of any lockout program.

ABOUT ANSI Z244.1 CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY

American National Standard ANS / ASSE Z244.1  Control of Hazardous Energy – Lockout/Tagout and Alternative Methods Standard is a publication by the American Society of Safety Engineers.  The standard provides more detail information, especially on alternative lockout methods than OSHA, and can be used as an industry standard to reference.

Contact Us for a Free Consultation on How We Can Help You with Your Lockout / Tagout ( LOTO ) Policy and Procedures Needs.