Auto Worker Killed in LOTO Accident

Detroit, MI – Detroit Police have confirmed the death of a 53-year-old worker this week at an FCA US (formerly Chrysler) plant. Police initially said the man was crushed, a Detroit Fire official said the man died as a result of his injuries. Donald Megge was performing preventive maintenance in a wastewater treatment plant when he was caught in a machine press.

The United Automobile Workers identified the worker as Donald Megge of Sterling Heights, MI. Megge was a millwright and wastewater operator at the Jefferson North Assembly Plant that makes the Jeep Grand Cherokee and Dodge Durango SUVs. The accident occurred shortly after he started work on the morning shift, the union said.

An UAW spokesman said Megge was performing regular preventive maintenance after starting his shift at at the wastewater treatment plant at 5:30 a.m, Tuesday May 5, 2015. He was discovered at about 6:30 a.m., according to the union’s statement. He was “caught in a machine press suspended a little bit above the ground,” said Detroit Fire Capt. Gerod Funderburg. Firefighters responded to the scene, but Megge was already dead when they arrived, Funderburg said.

The incident remains under investigation by state and federal health and safety officials, and union and company health and safety professionals. All three Detroit automakers and the UAW emphasize safety protocol for workers and visitors.

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Clearwater Paper Fined for Lack of Lockout/Tagout Procedures

Neenah, WI – OSHA has proposed fines of nearly $50,000 for safety violations found at Clearwater Paper Corp. facility in Neenah, WI. Violations included a lack of procedures for the control of locking devices to prevent the operation of maclocking devices needed paper productshinery during repairs, known as lockout tagout. The company was also cited for a lack of safety guards on operating machine parts.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration found nine serious violations during a December inspection of the paper mill, including those that present amputation risks. Matt Van Vleet, vice president of public affairs for the Spokane, Wash.-headquartered company, said they received notification of the violations on April 24, and company officials are in the process of review.

OSHA chose the Wisconsin mill for inspection based on its use of equipment that puts employees in danger of amputation. The administration has put an emphasis on reducing workplace machinery and equipment hazards. OSHA officials say the company and its union took immediate steps to address the issues raised during the inspection.

Clearwater Paper is the country’s largest producer of private-label tissue products, and its Wisconsin mill is one of 10 manufacturing facilities across the country.

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Grand Rapids Plastics Fined After Lockout/Tagout Death

Wyoming, MI – Grand Rapids Plastics Inc. faces $558,000 in fines following inspection by state OSHA regulators investigating the June 2014 death of worker killed while cleaning inside a machine. Russell Scharenbroch, father of six, was fatally crushed at Grand Rapids Plastics in a horizontal injection molding machine that was not properly locked out.

OSHA found that the Michigan-based injection molder did not enforce the use of lockout/tagout safety procedures prior to the 34-year-old victim entering the mold cavity. “The machine was left in automatic mode while the employee was inside, and another employee cycled the machine,” the OSHA report says.

Grand Rapids Plastics was cited for three willful serious violations related to this death and fined $70,000 for each offense, which included inadequate employee training and not using lock-out devices on the molding machine and a pick-and-place conveyor. Two other fines of $5,000 each were assessed for not having machine guards at the front and rear gates of injection molding machines and not developing lock-out safety procedures, bringing the initial penalties to $220,000.

A second companion inspection of the company, which has five buildings, was conducted a few days later. That investigation “was opened because MIOSHA discovered a pattern of employees entering machines while the machines were still energized and because many other safety hazards were observed,” the MIOSHA report says.

State inspectors slapped the company with an additional 49 violations, including six considered willful serious, and penalties of $338,000. The penalties and violations ranged from $1,500 for an employee wearing unapproved prescription glasses with homemade side shields while operating a drill press, bench grinder and lathe all the way up to $70,000 for not training the employee supervising the injection molding operations in lock-out safety.

These findings and fines put Grand Rapids Plastics into the federal Severe Violator Enforcement Program, which focuses on employers “who have demonstrated indifference” to their safety obligations. “The comprehensive companion inspection has two or more willful violations based on high-gravity serious violations related to the high-emphasis hazard of amputations,” the MIOSHA report states.

From 2011-14, Grand Rapids Plastics was cited a total of 10 times for serious and other-than-serious violations and fined a total of $31,250. Founded in 1976, Grand Rapids Plastics produces plastic parts for the automotive, home, sporting, electronics and construction industries.

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Ohio Pallet Manufacturer Fined for Lockout/Tagout Violations

ELIDA, OH — OSHA inspectors issued four willful, four repeated, and 19 serious health and safety violations to A & D Wood Products, a wood pallet manufacturer based in Elida, Ohio. Acting on an employee complaint, OSHA investigators found workers at risk of amputation, explosion and other life-threatening hazards due to lockout/tagout negligence.

Employees of A & D Wood Products were found to be routinely exposed to amputation, combustible dust and other dangerous hazards. The company faces proposed penalties of $133,540 and has been placed in the agency’s Severe Violator Enforcement Program.

Under hazardous working conditions, employees operated machines without eye protection and without effective safeguards from moving parts amid large amounts of combustible wood dust piled throughout the facility. The force from such an explosion can cause deaths, injuries and destruction of buildings.

Kim Nelson, OSHA’s area director in Toledo, stated: “A & D Wood Products operates a manufacturing shop that exposes workers to real hazards daily, creating an environment that forces workers to make a choice between their lives and their livelihood…With 27 violations, it’s clear the safety and health of its workforce is not a priority for them.”

A & D Wood Products workers were found to be exposed to amputation and other injury hazards because devices were not used to prevent equipment from suddenly starting during service and maintenance, a procedure known as lockout/tagout. Inspectors also flagged electrical safety hazards like cabinets not closed properly to prevent contact with energized wires. A & D Wood Products was cited for similar violations at the facility in November 2011. OSHA issues repeated violations if an employer was previously cited for the same or a similar violation of any standard, regulation, rule or order at any other facility in federal enforcement states within the last five years.

A & D also failed to provide hearing protection and audiometric testing for employees, which can identify premature hearing loss. Noise-related hearing loss is one of the most prevalent occupational health concerns in the U.S., with an estimated 30 million workers exposed to noise each year. Additionally, OSHA inspectors noted machine guarding and electrical safety violations, poor hygiene conditions and unsafe practices related to forklift operations, including leaving forklifts running and unattended. The company also failed to train employees on fire extinguisher use and about hazardous chemicals and products used in the facility, and provided inadequate personal protective equipment. In total, 19 serious violations were cited.

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Formed Fiber Faces OSHA Fines for Lockout/Tagout Negligence

Auburn, ME – Formed Fiber Technologies is being fined by OSHA for failure to implement lockout/tagout procedures that would ensure worker safety against such hazards as lacerations, crushed fingers, amputation (or worse) if struck by or caught in unguarded or unexpectedly activated machinery.

Employees at their Maine manufacturing plant use a variety of worker safety lockoutmachines, including robots, to make polyester carpets and thermoformed trunk liners for the automotive industry. An OSHA inspection found workers at risk of injuries because their employer did not ensure proper safeguards on the machines they operate. No injuries have been reported at this time.

Formed Fiber was fined $816,500 by OSHA in 2014 for falsified safety records.

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